Research Notes: William Morton Family Notes

Ancestors of William Edward Hulse Morton



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Generation 1
20 Jan 2017

6. William Edward Hulse1 MORTON (child of Edward, #12); (a.k.a. Poppa, Uncle Bill);[1],[2] born 16 Feb 1913 at Barrie St., Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada; at his Grandma Stoddart's House;[3],[4] married Marion Pearl Wixson, daughter of Samuel John Wixson and Annie Lucinda Blake, 29 Jun 1935 at St. Paul's church, Runnymede, Toronto, York Co., Ontario, Canada; where the maid of honour was Miss Marie Love of Thistletown and Rev. Edward Morely presided;[5] died 1 Feb 2000 at Kingston, Ontario, Canada, at age 86; buried 5 Feb 2000 at Christ Church, Holland Landing, Ontario, Canada, after services at Holy Trinity Church, Thornhill.[6]

From about 1915 to 1919, Bill lived with his Uncle George and Aunts Eliza and Minnie in Bradford. His first memory was of his Aunts preparing a box of goodies for George who was fighting in the Great War in Europe. From now until his first job, Bill would spend his summers with Uncle George and Uncle Clarence (Minnie's brother) at Clarence's farm north of Bradford.[7] In the fall of 1919, Bill arrived home from Uncle Clarence's farm two days late and so missed the orientation for his school - it was very regimented. On his first day he didn't know where to line up, or that you had to march to class. The prinicple helped him out when his class marched off leaving him in the school yard by himself. Bill remembered his mother telling him that, if asked, he was to say she was Dutch, and not of German heritage as was the case.[8] Edward Reginald Morton sent his "nephew" Bill the Boy's Own Annual from England each Christmas.[9] After finishing high school in 1932, and normal school in 1933, Bill began teaching public school. It was at Harwood Public School that he met Marion Wixson (the 'dead bird' story).[8] Between 1934 and 1935, William Edward Hulse Morton lived at 75 Raymond Ave., Toronto, York Co., Ontario, Canada.[10] Between 1936 and 1937, William Edward Hulse Morton and Marion Pearl Wixson lived at 78 Yarrow Rd., Silverthorn, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, followed by a short stay with Bill's parents on Raymond Ave.[11] Between 1938 and 1940, William Edward Hulse Morton and Marion Pearl Wixson lived at 4 Rutherford Ave., Mount Dennis, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, when Bill transferred to Bala Avenue School.[12] Between 1940 and 1949, William Edward Hulse Morton and Marion Pearl Wixson lived at 75 Raymond Ave., Toronto, York Co., Ontario, Canada, renting Bill's parents' house after they had moved back to Bradford. Bill taught high school and coached rugby and track & field at Vaughan Road Collegiate Institute from 1940-1945.[13] While teaching at Vaughan Road Collegiate, Bill coached Bantam Rugby (1941), Senior Rugby, T.D.I.A.A. finalists (1942), restarted the track and field program and won the T.D.I.A.A. championships with Senior Rugby over their arch rival, Runnymead Collegiate Institute (1943). To his students, Bill was known as "Mr. Mort", and "brought back that cherished silverware" as senior rugby coach in 1944.[14],[15],[16] In 1946, Bill joined Noxema Chemical Company of Canada Ltd. and became their Production Manager (1949), Secretary Treasurer (1950) and Vice President and Director by 1952.[17],[18] Between 1950 and 1954, William Edward Hulse Morton and Marion Pearl Wixson lived at Clarkson Rd., Clarkson, Peel Co., Ontario, Canada.[19] Between 1954 and 1956, William Edward Hulse Morton and Marion Pearl Wixson lived at John Street, Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada, with Uncle George.[20],[21] Between 1956 and 1965, William Edward Hulse Morton and Marion Pearl Wixson lived at 53 Grenview Blvd., Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada.[22] Between 1966 and 1973, William Edward Hulse Morton and Marion Pearl Wixson lived at Harbour St., Lefroy, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada, "The Cottage" on lake Simcoe.[23] In 1967, Bill became the Executive Vice-President of Noxema, retiring sometime after 1974.[24] Between 1974 and 1985, William Edward Hulse Morton and Marion Pearl Wixson lived at Con. 11, West Gwillimbury Twp. (Bradford), Ontario, Canada, "The Farm."[25]



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    Generation 2
    20 Jan 2017

    12. Edward James Elliott2 MORTON (child of Francis, #24);[26],[27] born 4 Dec 1885 at Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada;[28] married Alice Theresa Holtorf (see #13), daughter of Henry M. Holtorf and Mary Jane Hulse, 12 Jan 1912 at St. Ann's Church, 665 Dufferin St., Toronto, York Co., Ontario, Canada; where Edward was 26, and Alice 25. Witnesses were sisters Martha Morton of Collingwood, and Irene Holtorf of Toronto;[29],[30] died 31 Jan 1980 at Humber Memorial Hospital, North York, Ontario, Canada, at age 94;[31] buried at Christ Church, Holland Landing, Ontario, Canada, later that year.[32]

    He was also known as Ned.[33],[34] Ned received $2000 from his uncle George's estate upon his death in 1895.[35] He was confirmed on 2 May 1902 at Christ Church, Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada.[36] Ned, through his connection with cousin John Elliott, worked at the Standard Bank in Bradford as a teenager, and lived there, in a small apartment. He was transferred to Picton, then Belleville, following John, until moving to Toronto to work in the head office foreign exchange department.[37] While in Toronto around 1911, Ned Morton and Alice Holtorf met.[38],[39] He was a merchant in 1913 at 217 Pacific Ave., Toronto, York Co., Ontario, Canada.[40] Between 1913 and 1915, Edward James Elliott Morton and Alice Theresa Holtorf lived at 217 Pacific Ave., Toronto, York Co., Ontario, Canada, After their marriage, Ned quit the bank and opened a grocery on Pacific Ave. and they lived in an apartment upstairs.[41],[42],[43] Upon the birth of their second child, Mary, son William was sent to live with family in Bradford -- Aunts Eliza, Minnie, and Uncle George.[44] Around 1918 (or earlier) , Ned sold the store on Pacific Ave. for a good profit, and returned to the Royal Bank, becoming the head of the foreign exchange department. The family moved to Raymond Ave.[38] Between 1918 and 1940, Edward James Elliott Morton and Alice Theresa Holtorf lived at 75 Raymond Ave., Toronto, York Co., Ontario, Canada, where Ned was a bank employee (1924-26).[45],[46],[47] He and Alice Theresa Holtorf appeared on the census of 1921 at Simcoe St., Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada; where Edward (35) lived in a six-room wooden home he owned, on an income, with Alice (34), William (8), Mary (7), Betty (4), and Jean (1) also present.[48] In 1940, Ned bought a house in Bradford, selling Raymond Ave. to son Bill.[49] He was the acting postmaster, following his brother George's retirement between 3 Aug 1950 and 30 Nov 1950 at Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada.[50]

    Children of Edward James Elliott2 Morton and Alice Theresa Holtorf (see #13) were as follows:

    • 6. i. William Edward Hulse1 Morton.

    • ii. Mary Teresa Irene Morton; born May 1914 at Toronto, York Co., Ontario, Canada;[51] married Edmund Joseph Walters circa 1940; died from injuries in a car accident 10 Jun 1958 at Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, at age 44;[52] buried 13 Jun 1958 at St. George's On-The-Hill, Islington, Ontario, Canada.[53]

      She was a stenographer and assistant bookkeeper at W. Lloyd Wood, while living with her parents on Raymond Ave between 1934 and 1939 at Toronto, Ontario, Canada.[54] She was a stenographer with Noxema Chemical Co in 1940 at Toronto, York Co., Ontario, Canada.[55] In 1958, Mary Teresa Irene Morton and Edmund Joseph Walters lived at 43 Ridgevalley Cres., Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada.[56] Late in the afternoon of 9 Jun 1958, Mary was mortally injured in a car accident on The Kingsway. Police said the front-left tire blew, causing the car to swerve into a head-on collision. Mary died the next day from head injuries.[57]

    • iii. Alice Elizabeth Morton; born 23 Apr 1917 at Toronto, York Co., Ontario, Canada;[58] married Allan Wells Coulter; died 11 Mar 1998 at Oshawa, Region of Durham, Ontario, Canada, at age 80;[59] buried at Christ Church, Holland Landing, Ontario, Canada, at some time after funeral on 14 Mar 1998 at All Saints Anglican Church, Whitby.[60]

      She also went by the name of Betty. She was an assistant bookkeeper at W. Lloyd Wood with her sister Mary, while living at home on Raymond Ave in 1940 at Toronto, Ontario, Canada.[55] Between 1946 and 1949, Alice Elizabeth Morton and Allan Wells Coulter lived at 16 Meadowvale Dr, Etobicoke Twp., York Co., Ontario, Canada.[61] In 1949, Alice Elizabeth Morton and Allan Wells Coulter lived at 290 Victoria Ave., Belleville, Ontario, Canada.[62] In the late 1950's, Al and Betty moved back to Toronto and lived in Don Mills.[63]

    • iv. Jean Fitzgerald Morton; born 2 Oct 1919;[64],[65],[66] married Gordon Slightham 2 May 1942 at St. Paul's Church, Runnymede, Toronto, York Co., Ontario, Canada; where Jean was daughter of Edward J. Morton, and Gordon son of Arthur Slightham. Rev. Edward Morley officiated. "At the reception held following the ceremony, Mrs. Burton Stoddart of Bradford, grandmother of the bride, was among those receiving. The couple will reside in Toronto;"[67] died 25 Dec 2016 at Thompson House, 1 Overland Dr, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, at age 97;[68],[69] buried 20 Jan 2017 at Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, in section 35.[70]

      She was an assistant bookkeeper with W. Lloyd Wood (where sisters Mary and Betty had also worked), while living with brother Bill on Raymond Ave in 1941 at Toronto, Ontario, Canada.[71] She was a clerk at International Business Machines (IBM), living at 295 Willard Ave in 1942 at Toronto, Ontario, Canada.[72]

    13. Alice Theresa2 HOLTORF (child of Henry, #26);[73],[74] born 1 Mar 1887 at Orangeville, Dufferin Co., Ontario, Canada;[75],[76] married Edward James Elliott Morton (see #12), son of Francis Morton and Mary Eleanor Elliott, 12 Jan 1912 at St. Ann's Church, 665 Dufferin St., Toronto, York Co., Ontario, Canada; where Edward was 26, and Alice 25. Witnesses were sisters Martha Morton of Collingwood, and Irene Holtorf of Toronto;[29],[30] died 17 Nov 1971 at Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, at age 84;[77] buried 18 Nov 1971 at Christ Church, Holland Landing, Ontario, Canada, after a funeral at Trinity Anglican Church, Bradford.[78]

    She was confirmed on 26 May 1901 at Parish of Bradford & West Gwillimbury, Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada; at age 14 by Arthur "Toronto."[79] While in Toronto around 1911, Ned Morton and Alice Holtorf met.[38],[39] She appeared on the census of 1911 at 240 Margueretta St, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; where Alice (24) was a stenographer with the government ("at Govt House"), and a lodger with Joseph A. (28) and Viola Maude Hewit (30), and their four children.[80] In 1912, Alice Theresa Holtorf lived at 240 Margueretta St., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and she was a stenographer in the Agriculture Department of the Farmer's and Women's Institute.[81] Between 1913 and 1915, Alice Theresa Holtorf and Edward James Elliott Morton lived at 217 Pacific Ave., Toronto, York Co., Ontario, Canada, After their marriage, Ned quit the bank and opened a grocery on Pacific Ave. and they lived in an apartment upstairs.[41],[42],[43] Expecting her first child, Alice returned to Grandpa Stoddart's (Burton) house in Bradford in February, 1913. On the night of the 15th, the coldest day of the year and in the middle of a blizzard, her labour began in the north-west bedroom. Grandpa Stoddart told the story of how he continued to stoke the wood burning furnace to send adequate heat upstairs. When he noticed a chimney fire had begun, he rushed down to the furnace and with heavy gloves removed the furnace pipe, and plunged it into a barrel of water. The heat of the chimney drew up the water and quenched the fire. The next morning, Ned and Alice's son William was born.[44] Upon the birth of their second child, Mary, son William was sent to live with family in Bradford -- Aunts Eliza, Minnie, and Uncle George.[44] Around 1918 (or earlier) , Ned sold the store on Pacific Ave. for a good profit, and returned to the Royal Bank, becoming the head of the foreign exchange department. The family moved to Raymond Ave.[38] Between 1918 and 1940, Alice Theresa Holtorf and Edward James Elliott Morton lived at 75 Raymond Ave., Toronto, York Co., Ontario, Canada, where Ned was a bank employee (1924-26).[45],[46],[47] She and Edward James Elliott Morton appeared on the census of 1921 at Simcoe St., Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada; where Edward (35) lived in a six-room wooden home he owned, on an income, with Alice (34), William (8), Mary (7), Betty (4), and Jean (1) also present.[48]



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      Generation 3
      20 Jan 2017

      24. Francis3 MORTON (child of Francis, #48);[82],[83] born circa 18 Jan 1830 at Ireland;[84],[85] married Mary Eleanor Elliott (see #25), daughter of Michael Elliott and Anne Fitzgerald, 11 May 1864 at Clonmore, Co. Carlow, Ireland;[86] died after 12 hours of haemorrhaging, with care given by Dr. Stevenson 5 Jul 1911 at John Street, Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada;[87],[88] buried 7 Jul 1911 at Morton plot, Christ Church, Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada.[89]

      He lived before 11 May 1864 at Tomnafinnoge, Shillelagh District, Co. Wicklow, Ireland.[90] He and Mary Eleanor Elliott lived between 1865 and 1866 at Fairwood, Tinahely, Co. Wicklow, Ireland; where their first two children were born: Michael and William. There were, however, two farms named Fairwood, and it is unknown which one was their home: Fairwood lower, near the river and town, in the townland of Boleybawn; or Fairwood upper, in the townland of Gorteen, back up the road towards Woodmount.[91],[92] Mary Eleanor and Francis appear in a volume called the Index to Printed Rentals, listed with Mary's mother and siblings, in relation to properties in the Baronies of Clonkelly (Co. Fermanagh), and Dartrey (Co. Monaghan). These most likely refer to her father Michael's holdings in Annaghilly North in Clonkelly, and Drumard in Dartrey. Both these places are part of Clones Parish.[93] He and Mary Eleanor Elliott emigrated in 1880 to Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada; bringing their 5 surviving children. They settled on the property of his brother George, just north of the village, at Woodmount farm. The Morton family lived in the house that had once belonged Captain Laughton (George's father-in-law), remarkable for the viewing room on the top floor, from which Francis could look north and watch the boats come down the Holland River from Barrie. That house burned down, except for the back part, where the family lived until a second, though smaller house could be built. Aunt Nancy lamented that her mother never had nice things again, and this may attest to the lack of family heirlooms surviving from Ireland.[94] He and Mary Eleanor Elliott appeared on the census of 1881 at Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada; where Francis (48) was a farmer, and Mary (35), Michael (15), William (13), Eliza (9), Martha (7), Ann (4) and George (3mos) were present, also Mary's nephews John (16) and Michael (9) Elliott, and labourer Edward Dunegan (27).[95] In Jun 1881, Francis Morton and Mary Eleanor Elliott lived at Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada, where Francis was also known as Frank, and was a yeoman.[96] He and Mary Eleanor Elliott appeared on the census of 1891 at Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada; where Francis (59) was farming, and Mary (47), William (24), Eliza (19), Martha (17), Ann (14), George (10) and Edward (5) were present.[97] Around 1894, after William married Minnie Wood, Francis, Mary and the remaining children moved into the village.[98] On 14 Dec 1895, Francis purchased the burial plot at Christ Church, Holland Landing used for his wife Mary. Son William was a church warden at the time, and signed the conveyance. Lot 40 was 20 x 12 feet, and cost $20; the witness was Annie Morton, and it became known as the Morton plot.[99] He appeared on the census of 1901 at Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada; where Eliza (29), Anna (24) and Edward (15) were present. Francis (72) was living by his own means, in a 4-room wooden home east of Yonge, north of Queen on lot 107 (corner Mt. Albert Rd. & Newmarket St. today).[100] He and Mary Minnie Wood appeared on the census of 1911 at Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada; where Minnie (42) and Mary (12), lived with father-in-law Francis (80) living on 'income', brother-in-law George (30) a grocery salesman, and sister-in-law Elizabeth (38).[101]

      Children of Francis3 Morton and Mary Eleanor Elliott (see #25) were as follows:

      • i. Michael Elliott2 Morton; born 12 Jun 1865 at Tinahely, Co. Wicklow, Ireland;[102] baptized 30 Jul 1865 at Fairwood, Tinahely, Co. Wicklow, Ireland;[103] died May 1881 at age 15;[104] buried 30 May 1881 at Dr. Morton's vault, Christ Church, Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada.[105]

      • ii. William Edward Dean Barret Morton; born 19 Dec 1866 at Fairwood, Tinahely, Co. Wicklow, Ireland;[106] married Mary Minnie Wood, daughter of Robert Wood and Susan Fennell, 28 Apr 1897 at Coulson's Hill Anglican, West Gwillimbury, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada;[107],[108] died 1 Nov 1904 at Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada, at age 37;[109] buried 2 Nov 1904 at Morton plot, Christ Church, Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada.[89]

        In 1895, William and Minnie received Woodmount farm from the estate of his Uncle George.[110] In 1895, William was a church warden at Christ Church, Holland Landing.[111] He and Mary Minnie Wood appeared on the census of 1901 at Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada; where daughter Mary and a live-in labourer were present. The family lived in a 3-room wooden home, with several outbuilding on 300 acres, lot 110 East Yonge Street.[112] On 9 Jan 1905, William's estate was inventoried for the Surrogate Court. The following real estate was recorded: west half of lots 109 and 110, concession 1 east of Yonge St., south-west part of lot 108, concession 1 west of Yonge St, Township of East Gwillimbury. The declaration was made by his widow, Minnie, and was witnessed by family friend and lawyer T.W.W. Evans.[113]

      • iii. Geraldine Morton; born circa 1868 at Ireland;[114] died of tetanus or 'lock jaw' from injuring her hand in a machine circa 1875 at Ireland.[115]

        In her history of the Morton family, Aunt Nancy originally said her name was Genevieve. This was later corrected to Geraldine by Poppa (William E.H. Morton) in reference to the Morton stone in Holland Landing.[116],[117]

      • iv. Elizabeth Ann Dean Morton; born 22 Feb 1872 at Coolatin, Co. Wicklow, Ireland;[118],[119],[120] died after a few days illness with pneumonia 20 Oct 1937 at Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada, at age 65;[121] buried 22 Oct 1937 at Morton plot, Christ Church, Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada.[122]

        She was also known as Aunt Eliza. Eliza received $1000 from her uncle George's estate upon his death in 1895.[35] In 1905, Elizabeth Ann Dean Morton and Mary Minnie Wood lived at John Street, Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada, after the death of Minnie's husband William, Eliza's brother.[123] In 1911, Eliza lived with Francis, George and Minnie in Bradford.[124] "During her 34 years in Bradford, Miss Morton endeared herself to the community by her kindly and gentle disposition, her unselfish giving... especially her work at Trinity Anglican Church..." including Sunday School, Junior and Senior Auxilliary.[125] Eliza's obituary mentioned she had suffered as an invalid for some years before her death.[125]

      • v. Martha Young Elliott Morton; born 28 Feb 1874 at Tinahely, Co. Wicklow, Ireland;[126],[127],[128] married Duncan J. MacEachern 1925;[129],[130] died 26 Dec 1934 at age 60;[131],[130] buried 29 Dec 1934 at Morton plot, Christ Church, Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada.[132]

        Martha received $1000 from her uncle George's estate upon his death in 1895.[35] She was graduated in 1900 at University of Toronto, Toronto, York Co., Ontario, Canada; in nursing.[133] She appeared on the census of 1901 at Collingwood, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada; where Martha (27) a nurse, leading 3 other nurses and 3 cooks.[134] She lived between 1901 and 1916 at Collingwood, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada; where she was the superintendant of nurses at Collingwood General and Marine Hospital (at least from 1908-1915).[135],[136],[137],[138] She appeared on the census of 1911 at Moberty St., Collingwood, Ontario, Canada; where Martha (37) was superintendant of the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital, leading 9 nurses, and 3 other staff.[139] She began military service on 3 Feb 1916 at Toronto, York Co., Ontario, Canada, joining the Canadian Over-Seas Expeditionary Force as a nursing sister with the Ontario Military Hospital, Canadian Army Medical Corps (C.A.M.C.).[140],[141] She left Canada for England on 2 Apr 1916.[142] She was taken on strength, posted between 11 Apr 1916 and 8 Sep 1917 at 16th Canadian General (Ontario) Hospital, Orpington, Bromley, Co. Kent, England.[143] She was granted leave between 2 Oct 1916 and 16 Oct 1916.[143] She was ill with bronchitis between 9 Sep 1917 and 5 Oct 1917 at 11th Canadian General Hospital, Moore Barracks, Shorncliffe, Folkestone, Co. Kent, England.[143] She was posted between 5 Oct 1917 and 2 Feb 1918 at 16th Canadian General (Ontario) Hospital, Orpington, Bromley, Co. Kent, England.[143] She was posted between 2 Feb 1918 and 16 Feb 1918 at H.M.H.S. Araguaya.[143] She went on leave between 16 Feb 1918 and 30 Apr 1918 at Canada.[143] She was posted between 30 Apr 1918 and 25 Sep 1918 at C.M.A.C. Casualty Company, Orpington, Bromley, Co. Kent, England.[143],[144] She was awarded the Royal Red Cross medal 2nd class on 12 Jun 1918.[143],[145] She was was posted between 26 Sep 1918 and 26 Sep 1919 at 16th Canadian General (Ontario) Hospital, Orpington, Bromley, Co. Kent, England.[143],[146] Martha attended an investiture at Buckingham Palace to receive the Royal Red Cross medal and met Queen Alexandra, Queen Mother to George V, at Marlborough House, on 17 Oct 1918.[147] She was struck off strength, and returned to Canada on 26 Sep 1919.[143] She ended military service on 6 Oct 1919 at Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; on general demobilization from the C.A.M.C.[148] She was the superintendant between 1919 and 1925 at Strathroy General Hospital, Strathroy, Middlesex Co., Ontario, Canada.[149]

      • vi. Anna Isobel Fitzgerald Morton; born 26 Oct 1876 at Tinahely, Co. Wicklow, Ireland; and was so ill as an infant, she was baptised at home;[150],[151] married John William Mather 14 Jan 1909 at Trinity Church, Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada; where John was recorded as a merchant, son of James A. Mather and G (or C) Prentice. Nancy was a nurse, 31, of Bradford, daughter of Francis M. Morton. Martha Elliott Morton (of Collingwood) witnessed;[152],[153] died 1972;[154] buried 1972 at New Lowell Church Cemetery, row 1, New Lowell, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada.[155]

        Nancy received $1000 from her uncle George's estate upon his death in 1895.[35] As of after 1898, she also went by the name of Aunt Nancy. Nancy met John Mathers in 1907 at the Collingwood Hospital when his wife Anne (nee Carter) was ill and dying.[156] She and John William Mather appeared on the census of 1911 at Sunnidale Twp., Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada; where John (33) and Annie (34) lived with his father James (60), and Hilda (5) and Annie (3) were present.[157]

      • vii. George Dean Laughton Morton; born 7 Jan 1881 at Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada;[158] baptized 16 Jun 1881 at Christ Church, Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada; sponsored by Dr. George and Mrs. Morton;[159] married Marjorie Noblete Hawkins 1938;[160] died 17 Mar 1968 at Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada, at age 87.[161]

        George received $1000 in cash and $1000 in stock from his uncle George's estate upon his death in 1895.[35] As a teenager, George worked in Elliot's Store in Bradford. He boarded at the local Hotel.[44] He was confirmed on 17 Jul 1904 at Trinity Church, Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada.[162] In 1905, George Dean Laughton Morton lived at John Street, Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada, living with his family which moved to Bradford on the death of his brother William.[163] In 1911, George lived with Minnie, Elizabeth and father Francis in Bradford, and was a grocery salesman.[124] He began military service on 10 Apr 1916 at Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada, with the Canadian Over-Seas Expeditionary Force, 177th Overseas Battalion of the Barrie Foresters. At the time he declared he was a clerk, 34 years old, 5 ft 5½ in. tall, dark complexion, brown eyes and hair.[164] He was ill with a meibomian cyst between 15 Mar 1917 and 3 Apr 1917 at Base Hospital.[165],[166] He travelled from Halifax, Canada to Liverpool, England aboard S.S. Metagama between 1 May 1917 and 14 May 1917.[167],[168] He was an acting lance corporal, taken on strength between 14 May 1917 and 21 Feb 1918 at 3rd Reserve Battalion, West Sandling Camp, Co. Kent, England.[169] Holiday for all ranks. ...programme consisting of athletic and military contests was carried out on 24 May 1917 at 3rd Reserve Battalion, West Sandling Camp, Co. Kent, England.[170] A number of enemy aircraft passed over camp about 6:10 p.m. and dropped bombs at Folkestone. 1 N.C.O. of 3rd Can. Res. Battn. was killed, and 1 N.C.O. wounded on 25 May 1917.[170] He Battalion proceeded to bivouac, Tilmanstone, Kent. Manoeuvres: Tactical exercise in fighting a delaying action, counter attack. Air raid actions occuring nightlight 7.30 p.m. - 10.30 p.m between 26 Sep 1917 and 28 Sep 1917.[170] He reverted to rank of private at his own request on 20 Feb 1918.[167] He was taken on strength with the 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles between 22 Feb 1918 and 30 Aug 1918 at France.[167] He arrived on 22 Feb 1918 at Canadian Base Depot, Étaples, Pas-de-Calais, France.[167] He arrived on 25 Feb 1918 at Canadian Corps Reinforcement Camp, Calonne-Ricouart, Pas-de-Calais, France.[167] He arrived to join 4th CMR on 28 Mar 1918 at Cubitt Camp, Neuville St. Vaast, Pas-de-Calais, France.[167],[171] He returned from his first few days in the trenchs, on a line from Junction Redoubt to Chanticleer Post, and spent Easter Sunday on 31 Mar 1918 at Cubitt Camp, Neuville St. Vaast, Pas-de-Calais, France.[172] He witnessed a mass evacuation of 7000 locals heading west on 13 Apr 1918 at Les Brebis, Pas-de-Calais, France.[173] The unit fought between 17 Apr 1918 and 29 Apr 1918 at Hill 70, Lens, Pas-de-Calais, France.[174] The unit relaxed in Magincourt, marched through various villages, trained, worked on the defences of La Bassée canal, and playing baseball in May 1918 at Pas-de-Calais, France.[175] He The 4th practiced manoeuvers in Jun 1918 at Enquin-les-Mines, Pas-de-Calais, France.[176] They re-entered the trenches on 30 Jun 1918 at Mercatel, Pas-de-Calais, France.[177] The 4th launched a raid on 13 Jul 1918.[178] The 4th practiced musketry, and provided work parties digging trenches between 23 Jul 1918 and 27 Jul 1918 at Etrun, Pas-de-Calais, France.[178] The unit was relocated several times as a deception prior to the next major offensive between 29 Jul 1918 and 7 Aug 1918.[179] He arrived on 7 Aug 1918 at Boves, Somme, France.[180] They took part in the Battle of Amiens, capturing and halting at Follies between 8 Aug 1918 and 9 Aug 1918 at Amiens, Somme, France.[181] The unit marched, mostly at night, from Lucheux, near Humbercourt, Warluzel, and arrived at Lignereuil between 20 Aug 1918 and 22 Aug 1918.[182] George collapsed from the heat while with unit, transported by 1st Div. / 3rd (East Lancashire) Field Ambulance on 22 Aug 1918 at Lignereuil, Pas-de-Calais, France.[183] He was ill with subject to the "effects of heat", and that he "went down all at once yesterday" on 23 Aug 1918 at 29th Casualty Clearing Station, Gezaincourt, Somme, France.[167],[184] He was ill with sunstroke between 24 Aug 1918 and 28 Aug 1918 at 16th General Hospital (US), Le Tréport, Somme, France.[167],[185] He was "invalided sick" and posted between 28 Aug 1918 and 4 Feb 1919 at 1st Central Ontario Regimental Depot, Witley, Co. Surrey, England.[167] He was ill with sunstroke between 31 Aug 1918 and 23 Sep 1918 at Clopton War Hospital, Stratford-upon-Avon, Co. Warwickshire, England.[186],[187] He was ill with sunstroke, but later, diagnosis changed to Myalgia, and finally Trench Fever between 24 Sep 1918 and 6 Jan 1919 at 16th Canadian General (Ontario) Hospital, ward 13, Orpington, Bromley, Co. Kent, England.[188],[187] He was examined by medical board, judged to have dibility following Trench Fever, place of origin was Arras, "result category B" -- fit for service abroad, but not general service. Symptoms described as flu-like, with pain in back, legs, dizziness, aches, tremors in hands, and attacks of fever on 23 Dec 1918 at 16th Canadian General (Ontario) Hospital, Orpington, Bromley, Co. Kent, England.[187],[189] He was discharged from medical care on 7 Jan 1919.[190] He was attached on 5 Feb 1919 at C.C.C. MD2, Kinmel Park, Rhyl, Co. Flintshire, Wales, England.[167] He returned to Canada on S.S. Lapland between 20 Feb 1919 and 1 Mar 1919.[191],[192] He was taken on strength between 21 Feb 1919 and 26 Mar 1919 at #2 District Depot, Casualty Company, Exhibition Camp, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.[167] He went on leave and "subs" between 5 Mar 1919 and 19 Mar 1919.[192] He was examined by medical board, judged to have debility, "result category C" -- fit for home service, Canada only on 21 Mar 1919 at L Camp, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.[187] He ended military service on 26 Mar 1919 at Toronto, Ontario, Canada; as medically unfit for service.[193] He was the postmaster between 16 Mar 1933 and 9 Jun 1950 at Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada.[50] In 1952, George's wife Marjorie passed away at age 56.[194]

      • viii. Mary Francis Morton; born 7 Apr 1884 at Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada;[195] died Sep 1884 at Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada;[196] buried 24 Sep 1884 at Christ Church, Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada, aged 5 months and 15 days.[89]

        Mary Francis' birth and death years are given as 1883 on the Morton stone in Holland Landing, and as this stone was likely carved long after, it is assumed the church recorded dates of 1884 are correct.[197]

      • 12. ix. Edward James Elliott Morton.

      25. Mary Eleanor3 ELLIOTT (child of Michael, #50);[198],[199] born circa 1844 at Clones, Co. Monaghan, Ireland;[200],[201] married Francis Morton (see #24), son of Francis Morton (Sr.) and Elizabeth Ann Barrett, 11 May 1864 at Clonmore, Co. Carlow, Ireland;[86] died 24 Oct 1895 at Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada;[202] buried 26 Oct 1895 at Morton plot, Christ Church, Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada, According to Aunt Nancy, it was Mary's wish not to be placed in the Morton vault, but buried in a plot of land.[89]

      She lived in May 1864 at Minvaud, Clonmore, Co. Carlow, Ireland.[203] She and Francis Morton lived between 1865 and 1866 at Fairwood, Tinahely, Co. Wicklow, Ireland; where their first two children were born: Michael and William. There were, however, two farms named Fairwood, and it is unknown which one was their home: Fairwood lower, near the river and town, in the townland of Boleybawn; or Fairwood upper, in the townland of Gorteen, back up the road towards Woodmount.[91],[92] Mary Eleanor and Francis appear in a volume called the Index to Printed Rentals, listed with Mary's mother and siblings, in relation to properties in the Baronies of Clonkelly (Co. Fermanagh), and Dartrey (Co. Monaghan). These most likely refer to her father Michael's holdings in Annaghilly North in Clonkelly, and Drumard in Dartrey. Both these places are part of Clones Parish.[93] She and Francis Morton emigrated in 1880 to Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada; bringing their 5 surviving children. They settled on the property of his brother George, just north of the village, at Woodmount farm. The Morton family lived in the house that had once belonged Captain Laughton (George's father-in-law), remarkable for the viewing room on the top floor, from which Francis could look north and watch the boats come down the Holland River from Barrie. That house burned down, except for the back part, where the family lived until a second, though smaller house could be built. Aunt Nancy lamented that her mother never had nice things again, and this may attest to the lack of family heirlooms surviving from Ireland.[94] She and Francis Morton appeared on the census of 1881 at Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada; where Francis (48) was a farmer, and Mary (35), Michael (15), William (13), Eliza (9), Martha (7), Ann (4) and George (3mos) were present, also Mary's nephews John (16) and Michael (9) Elliott, and labourer Edward Dunegan (27).[95] In Jun 1881, Mary Eleanor Elliott and Francis Morton lived at Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada, where Francis was also known as Frank, and was a yeoman.[96] She and Francis Morton appeared on the census of 1891 at Holland Landing, York Co., Ontario, Canada; where Francis (59) was farming, and Mary (47), William (24), Eliza (19), Martha (17), Ann (14), George (10) and Edward (5) were present.[97] Around 1894, after William married Minnie Wood, Francis, Mary and the remaining children moved into the village.[98] On 14 Dec 1895, Francis purchased the burial plot at Christ Church, Holland Landing used for his wife Mary. Son William was a church warden at the time, and signed the conveyance. Lot 40 was 20 x 12 feet, and cost $20; the witness was Annie Morton, and it became known as the Morton plot.[99]



        Home > Ancestors > William Morton Family Tree > Page 1 | Endnotes | Names ]20 Jan 2017

        26. Henry M.3 HOLTORF (child of Christopher, #52);[204],[205] born circa 1861 at Canada West (Ontario), British North America (Canada);[206] married Mary Jane Hulse (see #27), daughter of Henry Hulse Sr. and Alice Theresa Doyle, 12 May 1886 at Orangeville, Ontario, Canada; where Henry was 28, a merchant, son of Christopher Holtorf and Elizabeth Sandford. Mary Jane Hulse was 19, daughter of Henry Hulse and Alice Doyle. Henry's brother Reuben was witness. As per family lore, Henry and Mary Jane eloped.[207],[208]

        He and Mary Jane Hulse lived in Mar 1887 at Orangeville, Dufferin Co., Ontario, Canada; for a time after their marriage, where Henry was a merchant.[209] It may be that Henry and Mary Jane left Ontario shortly after their daughter Irene was born circa 1889. Her birth registration was not recorded in Ontario, though she declared her birth was in Orangeville. The family lore tells that Henry was a "cheese broker" and the he and family went to Chicago, but only a widowed Mary Jane and the two daughters returned. No evidence of this story exists, yet his brother Reuban Holtorf does appear as a cheese salesman in Chicago.[210],[211] He and Mary Jane Hulse lived in 1893 at Windsor, Essex Co., Ontario, Canada; where Henry M. was a clerk at W N Winans in Detroit.[212]

        Children of Henry M.3 Holtorf and Mary Jane Hulse (see #27) both born at Orangeville, Dufferin Co., Ontario, Canada, were as follows:

        • 13. i. Alice Theresa2 Holtorf.

        • ii. Mabel Irene Holtorf; born 20 Feb 1889;[213],[214],[215] married Harvey Anderson Barnett 18 Nov 1913 at Reformed Episcopal Church, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; where Harvey was a civil engineer, son of John Barnett and Mary Anderson. Witnesses were Burt Stoddart of Bradford, and Alice Morton of 217 Pacific Ave, Toronto.[216],[217]

          She was confirmed in 1904 at Trinity Church, Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada; at age 15, and at the same ceremony as George Dean Morton (1881-1968) received his confirmation.[79] She was a nurse at Toronto General Hospital between 1908 and 1910 at Toronto, Ontario, Canada.[218] She and Harvey Anderson Barnett appeared on the census of 14 Jan 1920 at 313 Maple St., Manistee, Manistee Co., Michigan, United States of America; where H. A. (33) was a civil engineer for the county, and Irene (31), John Anderson (5), Mary J. (3y 9m), and Phyllis (2y 2m) were present, also two lodgers Theodore and Jane Norlin.[219] She and Harvey Anderson Barnett appeared on the census of 2 Apr 1930 at 1140 Genesee St., Saginaw, Saginaw Co., Michigan, United States of America; where Harvey A (43) wasa civil engineer for the county, and Irene M (41), John A (15), Mary I (13y 11m), Phyllis A (12y 1m), Florence (8y 1m), and servant Mary Zagula (16) were present.[220]

        27. Mary Jane3 HULSE (child of Henry, #54);[221],[222] born 20 Sep 1866 at Canada West (Ontario), British North America (Canada);[223],[224],[225] married Henry M. Holtorf (see #26), son of Christopher Holtorf and Elizabeth Sanford, 12 May 1886 at Orangeville, Ontario, Canada; where Henry was 28, a merchant, son of Christopher Holtorf and Elizabeth Sandford. Mary Jane Hulse was 19, daughter of Henry Hulse and Alice Doyle. Henry's brother Reuben was witness. As per family lore, Henry and Mary Jane eloped;[207],[208] married Alfred E. B. Burton Stoddart 3 Jun 1901 at Trinity Church, Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada; where Burt was a farmer and son of Wilson & Matilda Stoddart. Mary Jane was a hotel keeper's daughter, and widow;[226],[227] died circa 1946.[223]

        She was also known as May Hulse.[228] She and Henry M. Holtorf lived in Mar 1887 at Orangeville, Dufferin Co., Ontario, Canada; for a time after their marriage, where Henry was a merchant.[209] It may be that Henry and Mary Jane left Ontario shortly after their daughter Irene was born circa 1889. Her birth registration was not recorded in Ontario, though she declared her birth was in Orangeville. The family lore tells that Henry was a "cheese broker" and the he and family went to Chicago, but only a widowed Mary Jane and the two daughters returned. No evidence of this story exists, yet his brother Reuban Holtorf does appear as a cheese salesman in Chicago.[210],[211] She and Henry M. Holtorf lived in 1893 at Windsor, Essex Co., Ontario, Canada; where Henry M. was a clerk at W N Winans in Detroit.[212] She appeared on the census of 1901 at lots 5 & 6 Holland N.D., Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada; Mary Jane Haltorf [sic] (33) was widowed, Alice (13), Irene (14) were present, living with Mary Jane's parents Henry (61), who ran a 35-room hotel, owned also 5 town lots and 200 acres of farm land, and Alice (57), also Henry (26) drover, and Barkley (4). Four domestic servants were recorded.[229] She and Alfred E. B. Burton Stoddart appeared on the census of 1911 at Barrie Street, Bradford, Simcoe Co., Ontario, Canada; where Burton (41) a farmer, Mary J. (44), Hulse (9), and Baldwin ((7) were present, plus three English servants: Henry Clifford (56), Noel Lowry (21), and Margaret Renolds (16).[230]


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